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Why does pregnant woman need more energy

Nothing wipes you out like a good dose of pregnancy. Growing a baby is tiring work! In fact, feeling tired is often one of the first signs of pregnancy , and that fatigue can linger as your pregnancy progresses. One of the reasons you feel so beat is the rise of the hormone progesterone, which is needed to maintain early pregnancy but can also have a sedating effect on women, explains Temeka Zore, MD , an LA-based ob-gyn and reproductive endocrinologist with Reproductive Medicine Associates of Southern California. Another underlying reason pregnant women often feel tired?

SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: Stay SUPER Energized While Pregnant!

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SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: Taking Care of Two: What Every Woman Needs to Know about Pregnancy

The Best Natural Ways to Fight Pregnancy Fatigue

Dietary intake during pregnancy must provide the energy that will ensure the full-term delivery of a healthy newborn baby of adequate size and appropriate body composition by a woman whose weight, body composition and PAL are consistent with long-term good health and well-being. The ideal situation is for a woman to enter pregnancy at a normal weight and with good nutritional status. Therefore, the energy requirements of pregnancy are those needed for adequate maternal gain to ensure the growth of the foetus, placenta and associated maternal tissues, and to provide for the increased metabolic demands of pregnancy, in addition to the energy needed to maintain adequate maternal weight, body composition and physical activity throughout the gestational period, as well as for sufficient energy stores to assist in proper lactation after delivery.

Special considerations must be made for women who are under- or overweight when they enter pregnancy. This consultation reviewed recent information on the association of maternal weight gain and body composition with the newborn birth weight, on the influence of birth weight on infant mortality, and on the associated metabolic demands of pregnancy WHO, a; Kelly et al. It was acknowledged that estimates of energy requirements and recommendations for energy intake of pregnant women should be population-specific, because of differences in body size, lifestyle and underlying nutritional status.

Well-nourished women raised in affluent or economically developed societies may have different energy needs in pregnancy than women from low-income developing societies; pregnancy energy requirements of stunted or undernourished women may differ from those of overweight and obese women; and physical activity patterns may change during pregnancy to an extent that is determined by socio-economic and cultural factors.

Even within a particular society, high variability is seen in the rates of gestational weight gain and energy expenditure of pregnant women, and therefore in their energy requirements. Attained maternal weight pre-pregnancy weight plus weight gain was the most significant predictor of LBW and IUGR with odds ratios of 2. Low pre-pregnancy weight and BMI, and weight gain between 20 and 28 weeks of gestation were moderate predictors of pre-term delivery odds ratios of 1.

Women with short stature, especially in developing countries with inadequate health care systems and high prevalence of impaired growth during childhood, are also at high risk of LBW and pre-term delivery, and of obstetric complications during labour and delivery WHO, a; Martorell et al. A study of healthy women with uncomplicated pregnancies in the United States showed a positive association between maternal height and birth weight among white, black and Asian women, but not Hispanic women Picket, Abrams and Selvin, Weight gain during pregnancy comprises the products of conception foetus, placenta, amniotic fluid , the growth of various maternal tissues uterus, breasts and the increase in blood, extracellular fluid and maternal fat stores.

The desirable amount of weight to be gained is that which is associated with optimal outcome for the mother, in terms of preventing maternal mortality and complications of pregnancy, labour and delivery, and allowing adequate postpartum body weight and lactation performance; and with optimal outcome for the infant, in terms of allowing adequate foetal growth and maturation, and in the prevention of gestational and perinatal morbidity and mortality.

The range of maternal gestational weight gains associated with such birth weights was between 10 and 14 kg, with a mean of 12 kg. This is in agreement with earlier estimates that healthy women in developing countries, who eat in accordance with appetite, gain 10 to 12 kg Institute of Medicine, An analysis of gestational weight gains associated with optimal outcomes and full-term delivery of 3- to 4-kg infants in the United States gave a similar although somewhat higher range This consultation endorsed the WHO recommendation that healthy, well-nourished women should gain 10 to 14 kg during pregnancy, with an average of 12 kg, in order to increase the probability of delivering full-term infants with an average birth weight of 3.

The energy cost of pregnancy is determined by the energy needed for maternal gestational weight gain, which is associated with protein and fat accretion in maternal, foetal and placental tissues, and by the increase in energy expenditure associated with basal metabolism and physical activity.

Since then, several longitudinal studies in developed and developing countries have allowed for the revision of these theoretical estimates. Protein is deposited predominantly in the foetus 42 percent , but also in the uterus 17 percent , blood 14 percent , placenta 10 percent and breasts 8 percent Hytten, ; Hytten and Chamberlain, Total protein deposition has been estimated indirectly from calculations of total body potassium accretion, measured by whole body counting in a number of studies of pregnant women Butte and King, Based on results of the most reliable longitudinal studies, which involved 93 women in Sweden Forsum, Sadurskis and Wager, , the United Kingdom Pipe et al.

The corresponding protein gain associated with the mean weight gain of 12 kg range 10 to 14 kg observed in the WHO collaborative study would be g range to g. Cumulative fat deposition in foetal and maternal tissues contributes substantially to the overall energy cost of pregnancy.

Therefore, methodological errors in the estimation of fat accretion can affect significantly the calculation of energy requirements. Calculations based on skin-fold measurements lack the precision for an accurate estimate of changes in fat mass during pregnancy, because fat accumulation is not distributed evenly in all parts of the body. Two-component body composition models based on measurement of total body water, body density or total body potassium are acceptable only if they include appropriate corrections to account for pregnancy-related changes in the hydration, density and potassium content of fat-free mass Butte and King, Three- and four-component models where the hydration or density of fat-free mass is measured are acceptable to calculate body fat at various stages of pregnancy.

Fat accretion was calculated from the results of 11 longitudinal studies that used three- and four-component body composition models, or two-component models with corrected constants, in well-nourished pregnant women from the Netherlands van Raaij et al. Mean fat accretion measured up to 36 weeks of gestation was 3. Extrapolating the calculations to 40 weeks of gestation increased mean fat accretion to 4. The fat gain associated with the mean weight gain of 12 kg range 10 to 14 kg observed in the WHO collaborative study would be 3.

Rates of fat accretion during the first, second and third trimesters of pregnancy were available in a subset of the studies mentioned Forsum, Sadurskis and Wager, ; Pipe et al. Basal metabolism increases in pregnancy as a result of accelerated tissue synthesis, increased active tissue mass, and increased cardiovascular and respiratory work.

Several studies have measured basal or resting metabolic rate at several stages of pregnancy. As energy requirements should be based on healthy populations with favourable pregnancy outcomes, this consultation only considered the results of studies that involved healthy, well-nourished groups of women with adequate weight gains during pregnancy, who gave birth to infants with adequate weights Table 6.

As Table 6. The average increases in BMR over pre-pregnancy values were in the order of 5, 10 and 25 percent for the first, second and third trimesters, respectively. The coefficient of variability of the cumulative increase in BMR was 16 percent between studies, but the variability between women in each study was higher, with a cumulative variability of 45 to 70 percent in many cases.

This demonstrates once again that the application of mean population requirements to specific individuals may lead to large errors.

The variation in BMR during pregnancy, which is further illustrated by a striking reduction well into the third trimester of pregnancy found among undernourished Gambian women Lawrence et al. Hence, the cumulative increase of MJ associated with an average gestational weight gain of A review of studies on practices related to work and pregnancy indicated that in most societies women were expected to continue with partial or full household and other duties throughout most of pregnancy Institute of Medicine, Similarly, a review and summary of time-motion studies in Scotland, the Netherlands, Thailand, the Philippines, the Gambia and Nepal did not find conclusive evidence that women engaged in less activity during pregnancy and thus reduced their energy expenditure Prentice et al.

But these studies did not give information about changes in the intensity of the effort associated with habitual tasks. However, there was a suggestion of increased efficiency in energy utilization for physical activity during pregnancy, as the energy cost of weight-bearing activities remained fairly constant during the first two trimesters of pregnancy, even though body weight had increased by 5 to 8 kg by the end of the second trimester Prentice et al.

Some of these studies provided information at each trimester of pregnancy and in the non-pregnant state, suggesting that TEE increased by about 1, 6 and 17 percent in the first, second and third trimesters of pregnancy, respectively. This was proportional to recorded increments in weight gain of 2, 8 and 18 percent during the same periods Butte and King, The relationship between TEE and weight gain is reflected in the lack of difference between non-pregnant and pregnant women when TEE is expressed per kilogram of body weight Table 6.

Because of the larger increment in BMR, especially in the second and third trimesters of pregnancy Table 6. This was consistent with observations that many women perform less arduous tasks as they approach the end of pregnancy. The extra amount of energy required during pregnancy was calculated in association with a mean gestational weight gain of 12 kg by two factorial approaches, using either the cumulative increment in BMR during pregnancy section 6.

In the calculations using the increment in BMR, it was assumed that the efficiency in energy utilization to synthesize protein and fat was 90 percent. Adjustments for efficiency of energy utilization were not necessary in the calculations that used the increment in TEE, as TEE measured with DLW includes the energy cost of synthesis.

The energy cost of pregnancy is not distributed equally throughout the gestational period. The deposition of protein occurs primarily in the second 20 percent and third trimesters 80 percent. The increments in BMR in these trimesters are about 5, 10 and 25 percent, respectively section 6. TABLE 6. Energy cost of pregnancy estimated from the increment in BMR and energy deposition.

Energy cost of pregnancy estimated from the increment in TEE and energy deposition. Weight gain and tissue deposition in first trimester computed from last menstrual period i. Based on these considerations and averaging the two factorial calculations shown in Table 6. There are many societies with a high proportion of non-obese women who do not seek prenatal advice before the second or third month of pregnancy.

Under these circumstances a practical option to achieve the total additional intake of MJ 77 kcal during pregnancy is to add the extra 0. Rounding numbers for ease of calculation, this consultation recommends that in such societies pregnant women increase their food intake by 1. When such a reduction occurred among the women who participated in the studies listed in Table 6. On the other hand, not all women have the option to reduce physical activity during pregnancy.

In particularly, low-income women from developing countries must often continue a strenuous work pattern until shortly before delivery. Furthermore, women who are sedentary prior to pregnancy have little flexibility to reduce their level of physical activity.

Consequently, this consultation does not recommend a reduction in the additional energy allowance for pregnancy. Undernutrition, whether manifested as underweight or as stunting, and obesity increase the risk of poor maternal and foetal outcomes.

Ideally, women should begin pregnancy at a healthy weight, defined as a BMI between Adolescent girls who are pregnant must fulfil the dietary requirements imposed by growth associated with their age, in addition to the extra demands of pregnancy. An analysis of studies in 20 countries Kelly et al. These cut-off points were associated with increased risks of maternal complications.

In addition, weight below 45 kg or height below cm were associated with poor foetal outcomes. It is then particularly important that underweight women increase their energy intake to gain the prescribed 10 to 14 kg during pregnancy, depending on their height e.

The association of short stature with increased risk of either delivering a low birth weight infant or requiring special assistance during delivery owing to cephalo-pelvic disproportion Merchant, Villar and Kestler, indicates the importance for such women to have adequate prenatal attention and access to appropriate care during labour and delivery. This also reinforces the recommendations for good nutrition and measures to prevent repeated infections during childhood, which may result in stunting and in pregnancy-related problems at a later age.

Maternal obesity is also associated with a higher risk of maternal and foetal complications. As for undernutrition, the relative risks of neural tube defects, congenital malformations and pre-term delivery are higher in overweight and obese women March of Dimes, Incidences of hypertension, gestational diabetes and the need for caesarean section operations are also higher than in women with normal weight.

As this may lead to problems during delivery, it is likely that such women will be better off gaining weight at, or somewhat below, the lower limit of the 10 to 14 kg range recommended for women with normal BMI.

It is important to satisfy the energy needs of adolescence, when as much as 20 percent of total growth in stature can occur WHO, b. These needs increase during gestation and must be satisfied by appropriate dietary intakes to satisfy the requirements of both adolescence and pregnancy, in order to allow adequate maternal and foetal growth.

Compared with older women, those under 18 years of age have an increased risk of pre-term delivery, giving birth to infants with low birth weight or small size for gestational age, and requiring special obstetrical assistance Kumbi and Isehak, ; Larsson and Svanberg, ; Bwibo, ; Gortzak-Uzan et al.

The risks increase with decreasing age Bwibo, ; Bhalerao et al. Owing to the high incidence of complications associated with an immature body and small size, it is essential that, in addition to a suitable diet, adolescent pregnant girls receive adequate prenatal care and have access to appropriate medical facilities during labour and delivery. Abrams, B.

Pregnancy weight gain: still controversial. Bhalerao, A. Outcome of teenage pregnancy. Butte, N. Energy requirements during pregnancy and lactation. Compostion of weight gain impacts maternal fat retention and infant birth weight. Bwibo, N. Birthweights of infants of teenage mothers in Nairobi.

Acta Paediatr.

Energy Foods During Pregnancy

Too pooped to pop these days or meet friends for dinner, or make it halfway down that to-do list, or actually stay up for a prime time special — never mind the late show? Of course you are…you're pregnant! And while there may not yet be any evidence on the outside that you're busily building a baby, there's plenty going on inside at 9 weeks pregnant — and it's all hard work, the hardest work your body has ever done. What's more, your body's still in the process of manufacturing your baby's placenta which won't be complete until the fourth month. It's not surprising that you're always fighting fatigue — and feeling like you're fighting a losing battle.

Your body goes through numerous physical and hormonal changes during pregnancy. You must eat a healthful, balanced diet to help ensure you stay healthy throughout your pregnancy. By following some fairly easy nutrition guidelines, you can be on your way to a healthy pregnancy.

Pregnancy fatigue during your first and third trimesters is a common annoyance. Here are some safe solutions to help boost your energy and combat exhaustion. There are many reasons why you feel tired all the time now, including:. The good news is that you can increase your energy levels with a few simple steps, according to Andrew Weil, M. Here are some natural ways to combat pregnancy exhaustion, giving you more energy to conquer your everyday tasks.

Nutritional Needs During Pregnancy

Women often make dietary changes during pregnancy; however, dietary modifications and reasons for changes are not well studied. We aimed to describe the dietary changes made during pregnancy, describe reasons for dietary changes, and determine what changes aligned with recommendations. Changes and reasons were coded into categories. Women commonly reported increasing their intake of milk products, fruit, and sweet items and commonly decreased or eliminated intake of caffeine, alcohol, and meats. Changes made commonly aligned with recommendations for caffeine, alcohol intake, food safety, milk and alternatives, and fruit. Changes contrary to recommendations were common for fish and meats. Understanding the reasons behind dietary change during pregnancy will help researchers and health professionals design effective strategies and public health messages to promote healthier pregnancies. A healthy, balanced diet during pregnancy is essential to support optimal growth and development of the fetus and the physiological changes that occur in the mother. Fundamental aspects of healthy dietary behaviors during pregnancy include consuming foods that contain optimal amounts of energy as well as macro and micronutrients, achieving appropriate weight gain, adhering to general and pregnancy-specific food safety recommendations, and avoiding ingestion of harmful substances [ 1 , 2 ]. Previous studies have shown that if such behaviors are not adopted, there is an increased risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes including low birth weight [ 3 ], preeclampsia [ 4 ], pre-term birth [ 5 ], and neurodevelopmental problems such as fetal alcohol spectrum disorder [ 6 ].

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All orders within the UK qualify for free standard tracked delivery. Thank you for understanding. Energy levels in pregnancy can be extremely variable from person to person. During pregnancy hormone levels can play a part in how energised or tired we feel at times, depending upon our responses to them as an individual. When tiredness strikes during pregnancy it can often be quite dramatic and you may go from being quite active during your everyday life, to needing to rest and sleep much more than usual.

All you want to do is lie down on a floor anywhere and just sleep.

Your body is going through a wide range of internal and external changes in preparation for nurturing an additional life. During the first trimester , your body is literally creating an additional life-support system, heavily-taxing your energy levels. While the biggest building process involves making the placenta, the following life changes can also contribute to your exhaustion:. Yes — the first trimester of pregnancy is often the most exhausting.

Welcome to Pregnancy Fatigue: The Most Tired You Have Ever Felt

Growing a human is exhausting. Somewhere between morning sickness and elastic waistbands, Little Bo-Peep has lost your sheep she probably sold them to Sleeping Beauty and there are none left for you to count to sleep. One of the first signs of pregnancy is fatigue. It smacks you by surprise, like the sliding glass door you assumed to be open.

These five tips from ob-gyns can help. And this isn't the regular kind of tired you feel after a long day. It comes out of nowhere, and it's a never-felt-anything-like-it, can-barely-make-it-through-the-day kind of tired. But while it might stink and make going to work or taking care of other kids seriously challenging , just know that being exhausted is totally normal. One study published in the journal PLOS One found 44 percent of women felt totally gassed in the early months.

How can I boost my energy levels in pregnancy?

Background: Energy requirements during pregnancy remain controversial because of uncertainties regarding maternal fat deposition and reductions in physical activity. Objective: This study was designed to estimate the energy requirements of healthy underweight, normal-weight, and overweight pregnant women and to explore energetic adaptations to pregnancy. Energy deposition was calculated from changes in body protein and fat. Energy requirements equaled the sum of TEE and energy deposition. Energy costs of pregnancy depended on BMI group. Although total protein deposition did not differ significantly by BMI group mean for the 3 groups: g protein , FM deposition did 5. Conclusion: Extra energy intake is required by healthy pregnant women to support adequate gestational weight gain and increases in BMR, which are not totally offset by reductions in AEE.

Oct 23, - Having more energy can be achieved by increasing physical activity levels opportunity to develop friendships with other pregnant women.

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How much energy does a woman need during pregnancy?

Dietary intake during pregnancy must provide the energy that will ensure the full-term delivery of a healthy newborn baby of adequate size and appropriate body composition by a woman whose weight, body composition and PAL are consistent with long-term good health and well-being. The ideal situation is for a woman to enter pregnancy at a normal weight and with good nutritional status. Therefore, the energy requirements of pregnancy are those needed for adequate maternal gain to ensure the growth of the foetus, placenta and associated maternal tissues, and to provide for the increased metabolic demands of pregnancy, in addition to the energy needed to maintain adequate maternal weight, body composition and physical activity throughout the gestational period, as well as for sufficient energy stores to assist in proper lactation after delivery. Special considerations must be made for women who are under- or overweight when they enter pregnancy.

Dietary Change during Pregnancy and Women’s Reasons for Change

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Exhaustion During Pregnancy

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