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Alfred E. Neuman is the fictitious mascot and cover boy of the American humor magazine Mad. The character's distinct face, with his parted red hair, gap-tooth smile, freckles, protruding nose, and scrawny body, had actually first emerged in U. He also appeared in the early s, on a presidential campaign postcard with the caption, "Sure I'm for Roosevelt". The magazine's editor Harvey Kurtzman claimed the character in , and he was named "Alfred E.

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Alfred E. Neuman is the fictitious mascot and cover boy of the American humor magazine Mad. The character's distinct face, with his parted red hair, gap-tooth smile, freckles, protruding nose, and scrawny body, had actually first emerged in U.

He also appeared in the early s, on a presidential campaign postcard with the caption, "Sure I'm for Roosevelt". The magazine's editor Harvey Kurtzman claimed the character in , and he was named "Alfred E.

Neuman" by Mad's second editor, Al Feldstein , in Since his debut in Mad , Neuman's likeness has appeared on the cover of all but a handful of the magazine's over issues. Rarely seen in profile, Neuman has almost always been portrayed in front view, silhouette, or directly from behind. Harvey Kurtzman first spotted the image on a postcard pinned to the office bulletin board of Ballantine Books editor Bernard Shir-Cliff. Shir-Cliff was later a contributor to various magazines created by Kurtzman.

In November , Neuman made his Mad debut on the front cover of Ballantine's The Mad Reader , a paperback collection of reprints from the first two years of Mad. The character's first appearance in the comic book was on the cover of Mad 21 March , in a tiny image as part of a mock advertisement. Mad switched to a magazine format starting with issue 24, and Neuman's face appeared in the top, central position of the illustrated border used on the covers, with his now-familiar signature phrase "What, me worry?

Initially, the phrase was rendered "What? Me worry? The character was also shown on page 7 of Mad 24 as "Melvin Coznowski" and on page 63 as "Melvin Sturdley". In later issues he appeared as "Melvin Cowsnofsky" or "Mel Haney". In Mad 25, the face and name were shown together on separate pages as both Neuman and Mel Haney.

The crowded cover shot on Mad 27 marked Neuman's first color appearance. When Al Feldstein took over as Mad ' s editor in , he seized upon the face:. I decided that I wanted to have this visual logo as the image of Mad , the same way that corporations had the Jolly Green Giant and the dog barking [ sic ] at the gramophone for RCA. This kid was the perfect example of what I wanted.

In walked this little old guy in his sixties named Norman Mingo , and he said, "What national magazine is this? I don't want him to look like an idiot—I want him to be loveable and have an intelligence behind his eyes.

But I want him to have this devil-may-care attitude, someone who can maintain a sense of humor while the world is collapsing around him.

Mingo's defining portrait was used on the cover of Mad 30 in late as a supposed write-in candidate for the Presidency, and fixed his identity and appearance into the version that has been used ever since. Mingo painted seven more Neuman covers through , and later returned to become the magazine's signature cover artist throughout the s and s. Mingo produced 97 Mad covers in total, and also illustrated dozens of additional cover images for Mad' s many reprint Specials and its line of paperbacks.

Mingo's total surpassed Freas' in , and his leading status endured until , when current contributor Mark Fredrickson became the most prolific Mad cover artist with his 98th cover. Neuman has appeared in one form or another on the cover of nearly every issue of Mad and its spinoffs since that issue and continuing to the present day, with a small handful of exceptions.

Two such departures were Mad September which replaced Neuman's image with that of Pac-Man , and Mad December which instead featured the message "Pssst! Even when Neuman is not part of the cover gag, or when the cover is entirely text-based, his disembodied head generally appears in miniature form. The most notorious Neuman-free cover was April , which featured a human hand giving the profane "middle finger " gesture while declaring Mad to be "The Number One Ecch Magazine".

Conversely, the two covers that featured Neuman the most times were January , and December Each individual spangle, more than in all, was a tiny Alfred E.

Neuman face. Neuman's ubiquity as a grinning cover boy grew as the magazine's circulation quadrupled, but the single highest-selling issue of Mad depicted only his feet. The cover image of issue , [10] spoofing the film The Poseidon Adventure , showed Neuman floating upside-down inside a life preserver.

A female version of Neuman, named "Moxie Cowznofski", appeared briefly during the late s, occasionally described in editorial text as Neuman's "girlfriend". Neuman and Moxie were sometimes depicted side-by-side, defeating any speculation that Moxie was possibly Neuman in female guise. Her name was inspired by Moxie , a soft drink manufactured in Portland, Maine , which was sold nationwide in the s and whose logo appeared as a running visual gag in many early issues of Mad.

In late , Mad released a 45 rpm single entitled "What—Me Worry? Neuman and His Furshlugginer Five", featuring an uncredited voice actor singing as Neuman. The B-side of the single, " Potrzebie ", is an instrumental. Mad routinely portrays Neuman in the guise of another character or inanimate object for its cover images.

Since his initial unsuccessful run in , Neuman has periodically been re-offered as a candidate for President with the slogan, "You could do worse Along with his face, Mad also includes a short humorous quotation credited to Neuman with every issue's table of contents.

Example: "It takes one to know one Neuman is now used exclusively as a mascot and iconic symbol of the magazine, but before this status was codified, he was referenced in several early articles. In one, Neuman answered a letter from a suicidal reader by giving "expert advice" on the best technique for tying a hangman's knot. Neuman University". An article entitled "Alfred E. Neuman's Family Tree" depicted historical versions of Neuman from various eras.

Since then, Neuman has appeared only occasionally inside the magazine's articles. A recurring article titled "Alfred's Poor Almanac" a parody of Poor Richard's Almanac showed his face atop the page, but otherwise the character had no role in the text.

In a article, Neuman's face was assembled, feature by feature, from parts of photographs of well-known politicos, including then- President Lyndon B.

The gap in his teeth which was otherwise the grin of Dwight D. Neuman's famous motto is the intellectually incurious "What, me worry? On the cover of current printings of the paperback The Ides of Mad , as rendered by long-time cover artist Norman Mingo, Neuman is portrayed as a Roman bust with his catch phrase engraved on the base, translated into Dog Latin — Quid, Me Anxius Sum?

Neuman's surname is often misspelled as "Newman". Neuman's most prominent physical feature is his gap-toothed grin, with a few notable exceptions. On the cover of issue January , Neuman was featured with E.

The cover showed E. Neuman also appeared as himself in a political cartoon [ vague ] , after Newsweek had been criticized for using computer graphics to retouch the teeth of Bobbi McCaughey. The cartoon was rendered in the form of a split-screen comparison, in which Neuman was featured on the cover of Mad with his usual gap-toothed grin, then also featured on the cover of Newsweek , but with a perfect smile.

Despite the primacy of Neuman's incomplete smile, his other facial features have occasionally attracted notice. Artist Andy Warhol said that seeing Neuman taught him to love people with big ears. In , Mad published letters from several readers noting the resemblance between Neuman and England's Prince Charles , then nine years old.

So jolly well stow it! The postmark indicated it had been mailed from a post office within a short walking distance of Buckingham Palace.

Unfortunately, the original disappeared years ago while on loan to another magazine and has never been recovered. For many years, Mad sold prints of the official portrait of Neuman through a small house ad on the letters page of the magazine. In the early years, the price was one for 25 cents; three for 50 cents; nine for a dollar; or 27 for two dollars. The ad stated that the prints could also be used for wrapping fish. A live-action version of Neuman—an uncredited actor wearing a mask—appears briefly in the film Up the Academy which was originally released to theaters as Mad Magazine Presents Up the Academy.

Mad later pulled its support from the film, and all footage of the Neuman character was excised from North American home video and television releases, although it was reinstated for the DVD release. Neuman appeared occasionally in the early seasons of MADtv during sketches and interstitials, and briefly appeared in the animated TV series Mad.

Neuman's precise origin is shrouded in mystery and may never be fully known. Mad publisher Bill Gaines gave Reidelbach total access to the magazine's own files, including the collection of Neuman-related images that had been assembled for a copyright infringement lawsuit.

She wrote that, "[d]ating from , this is the oldest verified image of the boy The kid's features are fully developed and unmistakable, and the image was very likely taken from an older archetype The image is nearly identical to what later appears in the Atmore's ads. A description of the stage play's advertisement was published in the December 2, , Los Angeles Herald. Using words that could easily be describing the character of Alfred E. Neuman, the paper reported that the "comic red-headed urchin with a joyous grin all over his freckled face, whose phiz [face] is the trademark of the comedy, is so expressive of the rollicking and ridiculous that the New York Herald and the Evening Telegram have applied it to political cartoon purposes.

Me Worry? The New Boy advertising image was copied widely in advertising for "painless" dentistry and other products. It is also possible that the image influenced the look of The Yellow Kid , the s character from Richard F. Outcault 's strip Hogan's Alley. The image was used for a variety of purposes nearly continuously until it was adopted by Mad. Similar faces turned up in advertising for "painless" dentistry.

William Romine—often misspelled as Romaine—a dentist who resided and practiced in Wichita. Cook company in In , those opposing Franklin Delano Roosevelt 's third-term reelection bid distributed postcards with a similar caricature bearing the caption, "Sure I'm for Roosevelt".

In some instances, there was also the implication that the "idiot" was in fact a Jewish caricature. Carl Djerassi 's autobiography claims that in Vienna after the Anschluss , he saw posters with a similar face and the caption Tod den Juden "Kill the Jews".

The EC editors grew up listening to radio, and this was frequently reflected in their stories, names and references. The name "Alfred E. One character on his show had a name that was a reference to composer Alfred Newman , who scored many films and also composed the familiar fanfare that accompanies 20th Century Fox 's opening film logo.

Worried Man Cartoon Stock Photos and Images

Stop searching! We present to you a selection of 45 interesting and top Cartoon Worried Face collection. On our site with the button "search" you will find other great free clip arts. You can use Cartoon Worried Face images for your website, blog, or share them on social networks.

But along with the cartoon funk is an all-too-real story of police brutality embodied by a horde of evil Pigs. As it turns out, though, cartoon curmudgeons get the best, most ridiculous lines.

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Worried Man Clipart Cartoon

In a frigid New Hampshire winter, Jay Porter is trying to eke out a living and maintain some semblance of a relationship with his former girlfriend and their two-year-old son. When he receives an urgent call that Chris, his drug-addicted brother, is being questioned by the sheriff about his missing junkie business partner, Jay feels obliged to come to his rescue. After Jay negotiates his brother's release from the county jail, Chris disappears into the night. As Jay begins to search for him, he is plunged into a cauldron of ugly lies and long-kept secrets that could tear apart his small hometown and threaten the lives of Jay and all those he holds dear. Powerful forces come into play that will stop at nothing until Chris is dead and the information he harbors is destroyed. Sometimes a book is just a quiet little thing. To comply with the terms and conditions that it seems people read more than I give them credit for, I hereby disclose in this, my review, that I received this book for free through Goodreads First

Collection of Cartoon Worried Face (45)

Photo "Cartoon man looking up and worried illustration background and speech bubble" can be used for personal and commercial purposes according to the conditions of the purchased Royalty-free license. The image is available for download in high resolution quality up to x Cartoon man looking up and worried illustration background and speech bubble - stock image. Download Image.

Photo "Cartoon man looking up and worried illustration background and speech bubble" can be used for personal and commercial purposes according to the conditions of the purchased Royalty-free license.

McFarland , 24 ian. This is the first overview of cartoon art in this important cultural nexus of Asia. The eight essays provide historical and contemporary examinations of cartoons and comics in Indonesia, the Philippines, Thailand, Cambodia, and Vietnam, and sociocultural and political analyses of cartooning in Singapore, Myanmar, and Malaysia.

Worried Man Vectors, Photos & PSD

We're sorry, but Freepik doesn't work properly without JavaScript enabled. Support Contact. Young handsome man doubting and confused, thinking of an idea or worried about something. Lonely man and woman sitting and crying on the floor suffering from depression or relationship breakdown.

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Um, no. Everything is reported; almost nothing is presented directly. I expected an anthology - this is just Jeanette C. Despite the stodgy stereotypes, libraries and librarians themselves can be quite funny.

Alfred E. Neuman

In a frigid New Hampshire winter, Jay Porter is trying to eke out a living and maintain some semblance of a relationship with his former girlfriend and their two-year-old son. When he receives an urgent call that Chris, his drug-addicted brother, is being questioned by the sheriff about his missing junkie business partner, Jay feels obliged to come to his rescue. After Jay negotiates his brother's release from the county jail, Chris disappears into the night. As Jay begins to search for him, he is plunged into a cauldron of ugly lies and long-kept secrets that could tear apart his small hometown and threaten the lives of Jay and all those he holds dear. Powerful forces come into play that will stop at nothing until Chris is dead and the information he harbors is destroyed. Sometimes a book is just a quiet little thing. To comply with the terms and conditions that it seems people read more than I give them credit for, I hereby disclose in this, my review, that I received this book for free through Goodreads First Lamentation : A Novel.

Aug 18, - #clipart #cartoon A Man Looking Worried While Looking At The Time and Outside A Large Supermarket Background - Vendor: vectortoon Type.

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A Man Looking Worried While Looking At The Time

This book is fantastic in retrospect on the times. He could see so very clearly. A spark to remember for the future. Read full review.

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Comments: 1
  1. Nall

    I can not recollect.

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